Disney As Adults: An Adult Retrospective Review Of The 2011 Storybook Adventure WINNIE THE POOH

Disney As Adults: An Adult Retrospective Review Of The 2011 Storybook Adventure WINNIE THE POOH

Disney As Adults: An Adult Retrospective Review Of The 2011 Storybook Adventure WINNIE THE POOH

In this installment of Disney As Adults, we explore the 2011 animated film Winnie the Pooh to see how it stands up as a stand-alone film viewed as adults. Read our retrospective review below!

The titular yellow bear from Winnie the Pooh has been a hot topic as of late - and the reason why is shocking to put it lightly.

For anyone unaware - the hungry bear has been outlawed in China with the release of the recent Christopher Robin unable to reach the Chinese market. The reason for this is because of too many comparisons between the plump Pooh and the Chinese President.



Pictured above: Chinese President Xi - but we aren't here to touch on that, so let's get into the actual film review.

Winnie the Pooh feels like more of an episode of a series than a movie, clocking in at a mere hour and ten minutes - and twenty of those are pure credits (except a short mid-credits clip), which is something the film's plot seems to suffer from. Apart from that, the film leans on nostalgia for its appeal but that isn't to say it doesn't deliver its share of fun and laughter throughout.

The introduction of the characters is a fun one - with Zooey Deschanel lending her sweet singing voice to describe the characters of the Hundred Acre Wood. Her particular vocals are welcome here, fitting in nicely with the environment and setting up the story to come.

This is the last Disney film to be made using traditional animation. The movie utilizes a storybook aesthetic to inject the much-nostalgia into this movie. Eventually this even begins to affect the plot which adds a bit of hilarity to the mix.



All of the problems throughout the movie are created by the ignorance of the characters - collectively breathing life into an imaginary monster called the "Backson" merely because they misread Christopher Robin's note saying he would be back soon.

The ensuing music number The Backson Song is worth getting there with an interesting animation style being interjected amd the cast singing about what exactly this monstrous beast is fueled by their individual fears.



Something that has done rounds on the internet for years and surely isn't a topic discussed as children is that the characters of the film each represent a different mental disorder. Christopher Robin has Schizophrenia, using his stuffed toys to represent his repressed emotions.

Any adult with an understanding of mental disorders will immediately recognize that Rabbit suffers from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, needing to have everything in order at all times. Poor Piglet has Generalized Anxiety Disorder and can never relax. Kanga has Social Anixety Disorder, always over-protecting her son Roo, who the internet thinks has Autism Spectrum Disorder. Tigger has ADHD which is why he is literally bouncing off of the walls at all times, while Owl - the most intelligent - suffers from Dyslexia. The titular character, Winnie the Pooh himself is Obsessive Compulsive - as evidenced by his relationship with honey.

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Tubby little cubby all stuffed with fluff? Uh-huh.

Whether or not these characters were initially intended to be examples of mental disorders or it was mere coincidence - the characters are each distinctly different and none of them suffer being trapped in a single dimension - and their versions in this film stand up and stay true to their original selves.

One interesting thing noticed during an adult viewing is just how much of this movie's plot is driven by the characters' collective ignorance. This at times is extremely clever and fuels laughs - usually.

However, at other times, it seems to cause the movie to stretch - which is odd for the extremely short runtime. However, the film seems to recognize that by being strangely self-aware as Pooh points out when saying "It does lag a bit in the middle" regarding something else entirely. We can't help but hear him, though.

The animation is exactly what this franchise needs and the music is catchy - guiding you on the short but fun-filled adventure through the Hundred Acre Wood that will be welcome for anyone looking to revisit the old friends they grew up with.

However, the film suffers from having a very thin plot that seems more suited for a side adventure than a big screen outing. I can't imagine having gone to the theatres for this limited experience, but for very young children its sure to be magical and captivating. People just looking to see their old friends won't be disappointed either.

Unfortunately, however, Disney has made an effort of delivering heart-warming tales that are memorable for decades - and no one is going to remember the Backson after a movie like this.

Winnie the Pooh is fun and nostalgia-driven. Children under a certain age will certainly laugh but anyone looking for something with substance will likely be disappointed. The film sets out to deliver a short tale and it does just that. Winnie the Pooh accomplishes it's goal - unfortunately it's goal isn't inything special. Still, it's worth at least a single watch for the familiar faces and fun - just don't expect to revisit it after.

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Return to the Hundred Acre Wood in this heartwarmingly original movie and reunite with the beloved bear and his silly but steadfast friends for a magical family experience. When sad old Eeyore loses his tail, Owl sends the whole gang - Pooh, Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, Kanga, and Roo - on a wild journey to help Eeyore and save Christopher Robin from the mysterions Backson. 


Winnie the Pooh is now available to stream on Disney+!
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